Monday, June 30, 2014

Summer 2014 Session 4 - Question 2

What was most insightful to you during the reading of this book? Give pages.

51 comments:

  1. Most helpful to me was the students scenarios. This gave me much more insight into what my g/t students are thinking/feeling. You cannot put yourself in your students shoes but the scenarios helped me to "feel" for what they are going through. Hopefully during the coming year, I will remember some of the things the students were experiencing while I am dealing with my g/t students

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    1. In response to Helen Roberts (July 1,2014) I agree the scenarios opened my eyes to what my GT students are thinking and feeling. I had no idea how much anxiety & frustration they could be feeling. I need to more sensitive and aware of their feelings.

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    2. In response to Helen Roberts and jchoy; I agree with both of you about the insights gathered from the student scenarios. One step further, I would like to have my GT students read them and see if they agree with them too.

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    3. I totally agree with Helen Roberts. The scenarios painted a picture that we have all seen, but the dialogue really helps to express what needs to be said to properly coach them.

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    4. Me too! the scenarios were eye opening! I loved the coaching strategies that went with them!

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  2. Most important and insightful to me was Chapter 7 on Explosive behavior or how to work with it. Page 75 has a Tip Sheet on developing Emotional Language together. Page 74 talks about how to avoid explosions and this would work for all kids. Choosing a word to calm themselves or to alert someone they are on edge and unable to explain what they feel will be very helpful in those instances.

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    1. I agree with Tatro's response on. July 2nd because I did find those tips very useful to use on avoiding explosive emotions. I plan on keeping a copy on my desk as reference during the times I need it.

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    2. C TatroJuly 2, 2014 at 9:33 AM, i also like the tip sheet idea. I also, just like sarah chu, plan on making a copy to keep on my desk so i can access and use it quickly when needed. I think this will be a big help to me.

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    3. I agree with CTatro about chapter 7 on explosive behavior being quite interesting. It is so easy to over react when students get so "over the top" upset. I love the idea of choosing a word to help them calm themselves as well. On page 82 it reminded me that the key to successful management of an explosion lies in the parents' and teachers' ability to disengage from the crises. I love the movie technique worksheet on pg. 77.

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    4. In response to C Tatro, I agree that this was a pivotal part of the book and gave great insight to a new perspective, The idea of having something on your desk to remind you of the concept/idea/implementation is also a good one.

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  3. Most important study about the book was the case studies and the tips from using the coaching strategies on page 180 and along all the analysis of dialogues. Next time, I'd like to be able to identify the problem in the conversation and allow the student to come up with a solution rather than do a blame game or have me just end up with a student that's non responsive. It's interesting how the author shows us how to phrase our questions and statements so that it's turned back to the students.

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    1. In response to Sarah Chu, July 2nd, yes it sounds like the approach you take as well as the language you use solves and prevents a lot of the emotions for children, especially GT kids. I will use the strategies not only for GT students but all my students.

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  4. The most insightful thing I read in this book was using coaching strategies on pg.136-137 and chap.12. By taking a coaching approach results in a positive learning experience for the student, parent, and teacher.It is much more beneficial "to teach the child how to problem solve and manage his own behaviors."

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    1. In response to JChoy, July 3rd, I agree teaching those kids how to problem solve and manage their behaviors will carry with them throughout life. What an important skill all kids need to be able to do. Self control with the use of these coping strategies must be reinforced and I must be consistent with whatever I choose.

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    2. Exactly, C Tatro on July 3. We need to teach children problem solving and coping strategies that will take them through life. In elementary school class size is smaller than middle or high school. I think we "know" our kids better in elementary. If we can teach them techniques now, they will have it to fall back on when they get older and wiser.

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  5. Throughout this book, I most enjoyed reading the scenarios with Emily. I found the notes to the teacher and tip sheets for home helpful. I have a child at home like this and I really feel like I have some tools to better parent her. I can teach her coping strategies that will bring better balance to our world.

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    1. I completely agree with you. I also have a child like Emily at home, and I felt completely helpless what to do with her behavior until I read the tip sheets for home and notes to teachers. Perhaps now I will spend less time frustrated and more time being a better parent and communicator.

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    2. I enjoyed reading the scenarios also in this book. I have pictured children from the past and I think that is what made it so interesting. As I read the scenarios I pictured children that I have taught over the last several years and now I have seen them develop into mature young adults - wow! They have all grown and matured into young women/men coping in the world we live in.

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  6. Chapters 6 and 7 were most beneficial to me. I work hard to practice a Love & Logic approach to behavior choices, and chapter 6 parallels it beautifully. Page 68 provides a classroom inventory checklist which will help keep decision making in check. Parent communication is not an issue for me, but I appreciate the reminders given in the chapter. The Movie Technique was insightful to me, as I believe children need to be taught an awareness of their own physical changes that occur during their meltdowns. And, page 87 displays the debriefing tips, which I find very useful. All of chapters 6 and 7 give the power and control of behavior back to the children. The teachers provide the framework and support as we enable the children to figure out their own behavioral responses.

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  7. There are a few points that resonated with me after reading this book. First, I liked the section about introvert and extroverts and think it is important to understand each students style and needs in regards to this. I think it is important to provide balance in teaching and class assignments so each child has opportunities to rejuvenate and grow throughout the day.it is also something I will keep in mind in trying to meet the emotional and behavioral needs of students. I also think the coaching strategy in communication is very important with any child; it helps to build relationships and to assist children in being responsible and problem solving. I will try to keep this in the front of my mind and to lead by example. I also think love and logic reviews and tidbits can help teachers who did not read this book as they relate to children with whom they work. The scenarios were helpful and provided insight to what a gifted child might be thinking and feeling. I also think I may refer to the notes to teachers in the future when faced with a difficult situation. I also liked chapter 13 "Behavior". I see a lot of students with varying degrees and symptoms and manifestations of stress. The dialogue examples were helpful and a good reminder of possible causes and ways to investigate and help the child solve his/ her problem.

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    1. Well said Becky Stephenson on July 10. I agree with everything you posted here. There was so much good information in this book and it will serve as a great resource.

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  8. I really enjoyed reading the scenarios with each kid and all the teachers notes. I loved how the book easy it was to read. The tip sheets were so helpful...I would love to make a copy of them and put them on a ring to have them close by again once school starts up. So many helpful hints...with great connections!

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    1. In response to Mrs. Rincon: I love the idea of putting these scenarios on rings for quick reference. The more we reference a situation and possible reactions, the more quickly it will become regular practice in our classrooms.

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    2. In response to Mrs. Rincon, I would love to do this! Such a great idea! It would be so nice to have these tip sheets in one place to be able to refer to for guidance.

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  9. The most insightful thing to me as I read this book was on page 77, Worksheet 5: The Movie Technique. I thought this was a great example/activity of how we could engage our students to think about how they respond to stress, etc. and to be reflective in their thinking and feeling, thereby taking ownership and feeling more in control.

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  10. I agree with Mrs. Rincon - having these notes on a ring - quick at hand would be very useful. This was very "real world" and easy to read. I connected with many of the scenarios which made the book closer to home. The tip sheets gave me many suggestions as what to do in different situations in the classroom and at home.

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  11. I found the "notes to teacher" and tip sheets throughout the book to be most insightful. Both of the sections are provide handy, easy to use, and quick to find information. I can see myself using the tip sheets when staff need assistance working with g/t students/ I can also see using many of Fonseca's strategies in just about any classroom. Love the idea classroom meetings just like we did way back in our TRIBES days.

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    1. Spot on! I agree that the notes to teacher made the reading relevant to my classroom.

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  12. I still completely marvel at the idea what GT students don't like open ended projects chapters1-2. That simple idea completely changed my way of thinking about GT students. Now I can see where it might be overwhelming and frustrating for a student not to have a set of expectations and rubrics. Now I just need to find the balance between allowing these students their creative freedoms without frustrating them.

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    1. I too found this idea eye-opening. When reading those chapters I was remembering past experiences. This has been a focus of mine the last couple of years and I still find it challenging. How much is too much guidance... or too little?

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  13. The most insightful part to me during the reading of this book is the "Note to Teacher." I would read each chapters through the eyes of the parents and then I would able put on my teacher hat to understand how I can support the GT emotionally in the classroom.

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  14. The most insightful part to me was chapter 12. I thoroughly enjoyed the analyzing of the dialogue between parent/child or teacher/child and the new dialogue using the coaching strategies. Every teacher should read that chapter, regardless of teaching GT students or not.

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  15. I found the case studies of the children which were used to explain the unique personality issues and intense ways to be insightful. Chapters 7 and 8 helped me rationalize the student behavior while lending helpful tips such as developing emotional language, the movie technique and learning to relax.

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  16. The conflict resolution checklist was insightful, in that it's something that both adults and kids should use. "Calm down" is something that so many people forget. As teachers, we need to be able to put ourselves in the shoes of a GT kid without totally becoming one.

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    1. In response to Charlotte McHale 7/26 I agree that the conflict resolution checklist appears to helpful and to assist as a resource when dealing the students

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    2. I have this one bookmarked on my Kindle to return to! Very good information...I will actually be sharing this with my kids.

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  17. The emotional intensity I have seen from GT students all make sense now. Parenting styles for GT kids that I have witnessed make sense too. This book has been extremely helpful with putting "it all together" for me. I will look at kids differently now--the ones I teach and the friends that come to my house to play with my children. I enjoyed the scenarios with the different students and at times found myself replacing the fictional character with a former student. The dialogue analysis and the good coach discussion will assist me in becoming a better educator and or friend(parents). This book will become a resource for me and I am thrilled to recommend it to others.

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  19. jbJuly 29, 2014 at 12:42 PM

    I started this book study as a teacher, but found myself and my child in so many of the examples! The most insightful thing for me was summed up on page 199- "Raising gifted children is a difficult job. More often than not, we feel overwhelmed..." I have learned a lot! And will be passing this book on to other GT parents!

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  20. I really enjoyed reading the scenarios and the teacher notes. The Tip Sheets have been very helpful as well. I will definitely be keeping this book close by. The scenario that really spoke to me was Emily. I have had many students this way, and have a family member that is the same way. This has really given me an insight into this type of student and child.

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    1. Agreed--the tip sheets are good "checklists" to bookmark and go back to at a later time for specific scenarios.

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  21. The student scenarios from pg 17 (eBook) about Andrew to the last one were very beneficial because over the course of the book you learned more and more information about the students, not everything at one, which is the same as the classroom. The way the book was laid out, it mirrored the situation in the classroom, as the year goes on and little incidents occur here and there, the teacher is learning something new about the student that needs to be incorporated into the students learning.

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  22. The tip sheets and student scenarios (like everyone else here) really spoke to me. I feel like I see so many of my students in Andrew (sprinkled throughout the book, but namely at 33%), especially. Having a few different strategies to help show me what works and what doesn't will really help me in the classroom.

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  23. The most helpful part of the book was following the three student case studies. As each idea/chapter was presented we followed the same student examples from the beginning
    to the end of the book. As a reader I could form predictions as to what the student response/choices would be.

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  24. The most helpful part of this book was the dialogues between students and parents and between students and teachers, using real-world examples of scenarios where things have been handled ineffectively and effectively.(74%--Vincent and his father was particularly good). I also liked the section on gender and giftedness. (21%). The differences between GT girls and boys and how they view their giftedness--and how they see success and failure differently--is an important piece of information to take into the new school year.

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